Got it!
We use cookies to enhance your experience. By continuing to visit this site you agree to our use of cookies. More info

Already a subscriber or advertiser? Enter your login information here

Friday, 30 October 2020

FREE! Sign up for the TIE newsletter and never miss out on international school news, headlines, resources and best-practices from around the world!

28 October 2020 | TIE Is Transitioning Too
15 October 2020 | Rising to the Challenge
30 September 2020 | Yes We Can MUN!
16 September 2020 | A Year of Recovery
03 September 2020 | Challenge Accepted
21 July 2020 | TIE Statement on Equity
19 June 2020 | Juneteenth & the June Issue
04 June 2020 | Black Lives Matter
22 May 2020 | Every Voice Counts
23 April 2020 | Believe in Books

  Enter your email below to sign up:

Ready to subscribe and get all the features TIE has to offer? Click here >>


INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL APPOINTMENTS

You are here: Home > Online Articles > Emotionally Intelligent Leadership in a Changing World

COVID19

SEARCH

Emotionally Intelligent Leadership in a Changing World

By Kim Marshall, TIE columnist

06/04/2020

In this Harvard Business Review article, Ronald Heifetz and Marty Linsky (Harvard Kennedy School) and Alexander Grashow (Good Wolf Group) say the current health and economic crises will bring about permanent changes, demanding revised leadership practices. Specifically, leaders need to work with colleagues on adopting new practices, distribute leadership in order to draw on collective intelligence, and lead in emotionally intelligent ways. On the last point, Heifetz, Linsky, and Grashow suggest:


Give yourself permission to be both optimistic and realistic. “This will create a healthy tension,” they say, “that keeps optimism from turning into denial and realism from devolving into cynicism.”


Find sanctuaries where you can regain perspective. Stepping away in some way provides a chance to see whether you understand the work colleagues are doing – and if you’re asking too much of them.


Debrief your workday with a confidant. Ideally this person is outside your organization and cares more about you than the issues at stake. You might speak with more than one confidant.


Bring more of your emotional self. “Appropriate displays of emotion can be an effective tool for change, especially when balanced with poise,” say Heifetz, Linsky, and Grashow. “Maintaining this balance lets people know that although the situation is fraught with feelings, it is containable.”


Don’t lose yourself in your role. “Achieving your highest and most noble aspirations for your organization may take more than a lifetime,” conclude the authors. “Your efforts may only begin this work. But you can accomplish something worthwhile every day in the interactions you have with the people at work, with your family, and with those you encounter by chance. Adaptive leadership is a daily opportunity to mobilize the resources of people to thrive in a changing and challenging world.”


“Leadership in a (Permanent) Crisis” by Ronald Heifetz, Marty Linsky, and Alexander Grashow in Harvard Business Review, Summer 2020 (pp. 10-17); Heifetz can be reached at ronald_heifetz@hks.harvard.edu, Linsky at marty_linsky@hks.harvard.edu.




Please fill out the form below if you would like to post a comment on this article:

Nickname (this will appear with your comments)
Email
Comments


Comments

There are currently no comments posted. Please post one via the form above.

MORE FROM COVID19
The use of face masks presents a number of challenges for ESL students, as much of language learning ..more
Teachers will try almost anything for their students, including, it turns out, teaching remotely wit ..more
We surveyed international school staff, asking them to suggest the top skills and dispositions neede ..more
COLLEGE COUNSELING WITH MARTIN WALSH
FEATURED ARTICLES
Language Matters
By Jon Nordmeyer
30-Sep-20
GORDON ELDRIDGE: LESSONS IN LEARNING
When Students Actually Build on One Another’s Ideas
By Gordon Eldridge, TIE Columnist
15-Jul-20
THE MARSHALL MEMO
Addressing Concerns About Student Screen Time
By Kim Marshall, TIE columnist
24-Oct-20
Teaching Remote Lessons in 25-Minute Chunks
By Kim Marshall, TIE columnist
14-Oct-20
THE PRINCIPALS' TRAINING CENTER
The Top Three Things Teacher Leaders Should be Doing to Lead Remotely
By Bambi Betts & Kristen MacConnell
27-Jun-20
Why We Did Not Go Virtual
By Bambi Betts, Director, Principals’ Training Center
22-May-20
TOP STORIES
Saying is Believing: Why Names Matter
By Jon Nordmeyer, TIE columnist
24-Oct-20